A Different Way to Look at Halloween Candy Consumption

Have you been noticing Halloween wares on the aisles of all of your favorite stores for weeks now? Consumerism has changed so much over the years, you can even find Christmas items before October 31st. For most children in America, however, the next month will have one focus – Halloween. What is it that the children in your life love most about the spooky holiday? Is it dressing up? Is it going door-to-door to visit neighbors? Or perhaps it’s all about the candy. You may assume that Lake Orion family dentist, Dr. Brad Greenfield would not support a full blown candy binge on Halloween night, but there’s some things to bear in mind when your children indulge in all of that sugar.

Stop the Spread of Cavities

It’s a natural thing for parents to take the tactic of rationing candy. Moderation tends to be considered best in all consumption. However, when it comes to sugar, it may be better to let your kids go all out less often. Why? The sugar in candy feeds germs in your child’s mouth (and yours, as well, if your sneaking a few Snickers here and there). If you tell your little one they can have one piece after lunch, one for a snack, and one as dessert after dinner, that’s three times the opportunity for germs to gorge on sucrose as well. By letting your child have the three pieces all at once, you can encourage them to brush their teeth afterwards and deprive bacteria all of those extra opportunities to create acid in your mouth.

Handle Acid with Care

Speaking of acid, one thing to consider is all of the candies on the market that are extremely acidic. If your child is a big fan of sour gummies, sprays, powders, or hard candies designed to make them pucker their lips and impress their friends, these treats are as good as taking a shot of vinegar or lemon juice in terms of teeth. Acid weakens tooth enamel, and is a big part of how germs damage your teeth. They produce acid as a by-product when they consume sugar. If your child eats sour candies, they’re adding extra acid to the party, and their enamel will surely be compromised, at least temporarily. If these are the candies of choice for your child, encourage them to rinse with water after eating, but wait for an hour before actually brushing, to avoid permanent enamel damage.

About Your Lake Orion Family Dentist

To learn more about our services, or to schedule a consultation with Dr. Brad Greenfieldcontact Lake Orion Family Dentistry at 248-693-6213. We welcome patients living in and around Lake Orion, Royal Oak.